The One with the Marquis at the Postmortem

Jean-François Parot, L’inconnu du Pont Notre Dame (2016)

The historical mysteries from Jean-François Parot is about the only series I read in order, and eagerly wait for the next installment. With every episode, I love the plotting and the details of the historical background, the good food and the familiar characters, but the suspense lies elsewhere. Even if the murder mystery is quite deep (the book has many red herrings, different stories weaved together and a multitude of characters that come and go), as we’re getting closer and closer to 1789, we can’t help but wonder what lies ahead for them.

The book starts with an unidentifiable victim found in one of the houses built on the bridge of Notre Dame, houses that are being demolished because they are too dangerous (you can get an idea from the French paperback book cover). Commissaire Nicolas Le Floch, who is also a marquis in favor with the King and Queen, is dispatched to solve the mystery.

This story is set in 1785-1786, and the Commissaire has been working for the King’s police since 1761 (under King Louis XV, that has been replaced in 1774 by Louis XVI, his grandson, a much less self-assured character). One famous historical episode set in 1785 is the scandal of the diamond necklace, where swindlers tricked a powerful aristocrat/former ambassador / courtier / cardinal into believing that the Queen was in love with him and stole huge sums of money and a diamond necklace (I’m trying to sum it up but really it was an elaborate scheme). Even though it was proven that the Queen was rather a victim than an accomplice of the deed, the distrust and hatred against the Queen only grew as a result of the scandal and the trial. The idea that the Queen could have given secret love rendez-vous to the Cardinal de Rohan just popularized the idea that she was frivolous and unfit to lead a country. Royalties who were supposed to receive their indisputable authority from God himself were acting like the commonest people and could be fooled by confidence tricksters. This was just one more step towards the Revolution.

Parot’s characters certainly are aware of the popular gossips and know also the depth of French socio-economic problems that plague the country. Poverty grows and elites are decadent and scandalous, the state is nearly bankrupt, people are unhappy with their present situation but can’t abide changes, popular unrest sparks off at every incident. It’s no accident that Parot, a former high-level French diplomat, has chosen the 18th century as his era of choice, as so many things remind us of our contemporary times.

The Commissaire is loyal to the king and to monarchy itself, but his assistant, who has followed the events in America with interest, wouldn’t mind changing the regime altogether. Yet they don’t seem to understand what turmoil is actually getting closer to them. All this to say, this book is the perfect, clever comfort read and I can’t wait for the next installment!

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