The One on the Tiny Desert Island

Tove Jansson, The Summer Book (Swedish 1972)

Goodreads informs me that I started reading the Summer Book at the end of August. It took me a semester to finish! But I hasten to add that it’s because it was so good that I took my time, not because I didn’t like it. It’s not the kind of books that you should hurry.

It’s a very atmospheric book and you should wait to be in the right mood to savour it, otherwise you’d miss all the fun. The more I stayed with the book, the more familiar I grew with little Sophia, 6-year-old, her grandmother and the tiny island on the gulf of Finland where they spend the summer.

The stories are told with a few evocative steps, the writing is fresh and simple and the reader is left to fill it in with her own comprehension. It’s easier to miss tiny changes of mood, because it’s not only about nature and the sea and the isolated island they live on, it’s more about the feeling of mortality, the inevitable change and passing of time. At the very beginning, the reader is informed that Sophia’s mother died recently, but only because Sophia notices that she doesn’t have to share her bed anymore. Not another word will be added to the gate of the mother and the grief of the family. We also guess that Sophia’s grandmother has some health problems, but neither Sophia or the grandmother seem to worry. The summer is short and soon the bad weather will return and the island will be deserted, so you’d better live one day at a time.

I wouldn’t want people to imagine that the book is full of heavy subjects. On the contrary, it’s light and witty, full of scenes where Sophia is stubborn and the grandmother is too. They both like to play and pretend, they like to create. Strong-willed and fanciful, they create worlds and adventures out of ordinary days in a tiny island. Nature is a huge presence in the book, and summer in the gulf of Finland is not like a sandy beach on the Cote d’Azur, it’s full of rocks, moss and perpetual winds.

If you know Tove Jansson from the Moomins, you will get the same sense of seriousness and fancy mixed together. You can see glimpses of Moominpappa when Sophia is full of bad faith, both philosophical and adventurous. You can see glimpses of Moominmamma in the grandmother’s practical attitude, in her open-mindedness and stubbornness. It’s a tiny, perfect gem of a book, that needs to be re-read at leisure, even in the depths of winter.

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2 thoughts on “The One on the Tiny Desert Island

  1. This is a nice one. I read it many years ago and liked it very much but haven’t read anything else by her since. I’ve heard the Winter Book is really good so come fall or maybe if it is really hot this summer, I hope to make time for it.

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