The One with the Rusalka and the Domovoy

Katherine Arden, The Bear and the Nightingale (2017)

It’s not often that I call a book enchanting. In fact, WordPress tells me that in more than ten years of blogging, I used this word exactly three times. But today, this word seems totally warranted, literally and figuratively.

I am very grateful to the publisher and Netgalley for giving me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review, and I am even more grateful to Annie from A Bookish type who steered me towards this book in the first place.

This book is a mix between history and fairy tales. It is set in the wilderness of Russian  northern territory somewhere around the 14th century. Dangers abound, people live a harsh life close to their village and close to the oven, a huge construction insuring heat and survival in the deepest months of winter. In some ways, this book reminded me of the Plague Charmer by Karen Maitland, that was also set in the early Middle ages, but the Bear and the Nightingale is less violent.

Living and sleeping on the oven with no entertainment, people spent their evenings telling fairy tales, and not of the Disney type. Russian folks tales are known to feature all kinds of wicked creatures, free spirits from the lakes and woods, but also benevolent fairies who protect humans, hearth, animals, as long as people remember to give them little offerings. This reminds me strongly of the Japanese folks tales where creatures are not particularly human friendly either. These beliefs strongly clashed with the development of orthodox faith, that saw animism as sin and traditions as a refusal of Christian redemption.

All these ideas are woven into the novel that also reads as a breathless adventure. I fell quickly into the plot and it didn’t leave me until the last page.

I am normally fearful of Russian novels. You know, War and Peace, Tolstoy, Bulgakov and Anna Karenina. My brain can’t remember all these names and… well, I know this is really prejudice. But this one, I had no problem remembering the fearless Vasilisa, even when her folks called her Vasya or Devushka. I had no problem memorizing the weird names of the various spirits, rusalka, vazila, upyr or other banniks, as if they all had cast a spell on me!

This is probably a book more suited to the winter months than the spring, but I certainly recommend it warmly!

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9 thoughts on “The One with the Rusalka and the Domovoy

  1. I’ve had this on hold at the library forever – excited to see that you loved it! Thankfully I should have it soon and now I’m looking forward to it even more. 🙂

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