The One with the Temptation of Nostalgia

7cavaliersT3Jean Raspail, Jacques Terpant, Sept Cavaliers (French 1993 novel; graphic version 2009-2010)

I have started a post a while back, an enthusiastic one. Then I added a few sentences, a bit more reserved. And then nothing for a while. Now this post is nowhere to be found on WordPress, but that’s not that bad. Because I don’t quite know how to put this in writing.

I have discovered this graphic novel at my workplace library, an adaptation of a novel whose title is really unique: “Seven riders left the town at dusk by the Western gate that wasn’t guarded anymore”. Have you ever seen a book whose title is a full sentence?

The graphic story is set in 3 volumes and the art is exquisite, using the traditional French-Belgian “ligne claire” (clear line design). Except for the clear line, nothing is clear in this story. We discover a dying kingdom, a beautiful country of mountains, countryside and seaside where the population has died or disappeared. There has been a civil war, one guesses, but we aren’t told whom against whom. Except, by hearsay, we gather some evidence of terrible destructions and deaths. Children have broken loose and turned against their families. The few survivors hide and attack the passer-by in fear of new exactions. No trains arrive at the station, no boats follow the lighthouse’s indications and there are few supplies left anyway. The king commits suicide just after the seven riders leave the town, so I don’t think it’s much of a spoiler. They are a band of loyal men, young and old, who decide to try to reach a bridge on the other side of the country, both by desperation and bravado. What else can they attempt?

This story is really fascinating and charming, but it works like a spell. You can’t stop reading, and your judgment is suspended, and then when you close the book (in my case, the three books), you don’t quite know what happened.

7cavaliers-1What is the writer’s purpose? Is it only fantasy? In some moments I was really reminded of Lord of the Rings’ saga, especially the feeling that the great kingdoms of the Elves or Rohan have passed their heydays and now only doom and gloom remain. The feeling that Frodo and Sam try to do their duty even if their quest seems hopeless at some point. Not a particularly uplifting mood, but a very powerful one nonetheless.

Those seven riders are the last remnant of civilization, they stand for loyalty, aristocracy, Christian faith and moral values. It felt nice, until it started to feel icky, especially when bands of ennemies started attacking and they were distinctly African or Arabic clichés.

There was greatness to serve among the last to the rear-guards of a finished world. (my translation)

I won’t say that the graphic novel is overtly racist, but it is promoting a reactionary philosophy to say the least. When I looked up the author, Jean Raspail (born 1925), I discovered that he was indeed a deeply conservative, old-Catholic, pro-monarchy, controversial journalist, novelist and adventurer. Not really my cup of tea at all.

It’s quite worrisome when those ideas are presented with muted colors, elegant sentences and impeccable grammar rather than the yelling abuse of some recent political meetings we have grown used to. Because they seem so fine at first. Then you can understand their lure of nostalgia for some people who are taking refuge in the extreme.

Still, the end of civilization is not yet at our gates, with 65% voting for Macron yesterday. Whew!

 

 

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4 thoughts on “The One with the Temptation of Nostalgia

  1. Congratulations on the election, for starters!

    I can see why this would make you feel icky reading it. I think nostalgia is a key element in the nationalist movement here in the US – a supposed “better time” that only existed for those in power (white men)in the first place. Too bad this message got the beautiful graphic novel treatment!

    • The mood is not really congratulatory but one of relief. Parliament elections are due soon and political headaches are not over I’m afraid. I am guessing that the better times of the US nationalists are the 1950s; here (in the aesthetics of this particular book) the better times are rather end of 19C… which is quite far back! I won’t say don’t read it, because of creative license and free speech, but I’d say read it with caution.

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